After a successful launch of the amazing DB11 grand tourer and the sell out of the mind-bending AM-RB 001 hypercar, Aston Martin is on a roll leading into 2017. The latest news out of Great Britain is that the famed sports car maker is actually looking to its past and building a run of DB4 GT continuation cars.

If you’re not familiar with the GT, it’s a short wheelbase, two seat version of the standard DB4, and formed the basis of the gorgeous DB4 GT Zagato. Between 1959 and 1963, seventy-five DB4 GTs left the company’s factory in Newport Pagnell and, in its day, it became known for its racing success. In fact, Sir Stirling Moss won the DB4 GT’s first race at the legendary Silverstone circuit.

Today, Aston Martin production has moved to a site in Gaydon (and St Athan, Wales for the DBX EV), while the old Newport Pagnell facility has been transformed into Aston Martin Works, a modern sales and full-range service facility, from complete restoration to maintenance of the One-77 hypercar.

These continuation cars will be built – appropriately – at Aston Martin Works in Newport Pagnell, which is where the company’s historic expertise resides. Furthermore, VINs will continue from the last 1963 DB4 GT chassis number, creating a clear, authentic line from the original cars.

A 340-horsepower, in-line six, four speed manual, and a limited slip differential are the basic specs, but the company says that construction of these new cars will have improved handling and braking, courtesy of modern engineering, and will be built closer to the DB4 GT’s original lightweight specification.

Owners will be able to enjoy an exclusive track program at circuits around the world, with instruction from top drivers, including the marque’s own Le Mans winner, Darren Turner.

According to Aston Martin, these twenty-five DB4 GTs are intended for track-only, but we hope some fortunate owners might be able to find a way to enjoy them on both the track and the open road.

Price? Well, if you have to ask…

 

Images courtesy of Aston Martin.

Published on Dec 10, 2016